Tag Archives: Spine

FEMECOT 2019

FEMECOT 2019

Date : 30th Oct to 1st Nov

Venue : Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

 

Please follow and like us:

VOSCON 2019

We cordially invite you to VOSCON 2019 38th Annual conference of Vidarbha Orthopaedic Society that will occur at City Sports Club(CSC) resort, NH-6, Amravti Road, Akola on 19th & 20th October 2019. Join us at Stall No. R-57 to see the entire product range of Smit Medimed’s.

Please follow and like us:

Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Spine surgery has advanced dramatically with the technology surrounding minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques. Surgical materials, nerve monitoring, and computer-aided navigation have improved significantly recently. With these techniques, the risks, recovery time, and surgical complications have decreased greatly.

For some patients who have spinal instability or have been recommended spinal fusion, it is important to understand what minimally invasive options may be available.

Advances in spine imaging, such as MRI, allow surgeons to see smaller and smaller spinal problems. Individual spinal nerves, bone spurs, and small disc fragments can be easily seen and diagnosed. Similarly, spinal surgery techniques have advanced to the point where some procedures involve incisions less than 1 inch.

Many modern techniques can be described as “minimally invasive” surgery, or “MIS.” For some patients, a minimally invasive procedure may be a better surgical option than a traditional or “open” spinal surgery. Instead of removing muscle attachments from bones, a minimally invasive surgery spreads and pushes muscles out of the way.

X-rays, computer-aided navigation techniques, and specialized tubes or retractors with special cameras or microscopes have led to major advances in the capabilities of MIS surgery. In addition to a smaller incision, MIS surgery has several advantages. It has been shown, on average, to cause decreases in blood loss, post-operative pain and narcotic use, soft tissue damage, and number of days spent in the hospital. On average, patients have a faster recovery, and return to normal activity and work faster.

In general, most spinal surgery can be grouped into 2 categories:

  1. Decompression
  2. Fusion

Procedures to decompress nerves of the spine include removing: herniated discs, enlarged ligaments and soft tissue, and bone spurs that are pressing on spinal nerves. In some cases, motion of the spine may become unstable or painful, either from wear and tear, trauma, or from a decompression procedure. These patients may be offered spinal fusion. There are MIS options and techniques available for both types of spinal surgery.

Minimally Invasive Decompression

A normal spinal canal is filled with fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and nerves. As the spine degenerates, spinal joints get bigger (just like the knuckles on our fingers), and discs may collapse or bulge. As this happens, room for the spinal cord and roots decreases and this may lead to pain or weakness in the legs. In severe cases, a minimally invasive surgical procedure may not be an option, and an “open” procedure may be the best choice to remove arthritic bone spurs. However, for some patients where spinal stenosis is in only 1 or 2 levels, a minimally invasive surgery may be a better option with a quicker recovery.

Bone spurs and arthritis is removed from the spine where nerves are compressed using a tube or retractor that is often less than an inch in diameter. A high-powered surgical microscope is used through the tube so that the nerves can be safely seen and protected throughout the operation. This smaller incision, less muscle disruption, and preservation of more of the patient’s anatomy may lead to a quicker recovery, and physical therapy can begin sooner.

Minimally Invasive Spinal Fusion

Spinal fusion is always a major undertaking, and any patient considering it should understand the risks and recovery involved. Damage to nerves, infection, failure of bones to fuse properly, or the need for more surgery is all included in the risks of a minimally invasive or traditional “open” surgery. For this reason, it is important that patients consider and fail all possible non-surgical or “conservative” methods with their surgeon before making the decision to undergo spine surgery. These non-surgical treatments include physical therapy, heat/ice, anti-inflammatory or neurologic-acting medication, bracing, or spinal injections before surgery.

Instrumentation used to fuse vertebrae together is placed under x-ray guidance through small and specialized retractors, with an incision about an inch and a half or less in length. Through the same retractors, bone spurs are removed, and spinal nerves are decompressed using a high-powered surgical microscope. For these patients, a smaller incision and less muscle disruption may lead to a quicker recovery and less post-operative pain.

The final tube requires an incision that is less than one inch, and minimizes soft tissue damage.

The final tube requires an incision that is less than one inch, and minimizes soft tissue damage. Reprinted with permission © bjerkespine.comWhen spine surgery is recommended, it is important for patients to discuss minimally invasive options with their surgeon.

Minimally invasive surgery, or “MIS,” is not the right option for all patients. It is important to understand why you may not be a candidate for MIS. Some surgeons have not been trained using these techniques, and do not offer them even though their patients may benefit. Before undergoing a spinal surgery, you should have a good understanding of the procedure itself and what to expect during the recovery process. Since pain and recovery are personal and individualized for each patient, no surgeon can guarantee a particular recovery course. However, for many patients, an MIS option may result in a smoother and more successful outcome.

Please follow and like us:

Postoperative Care for Spinal Fusion Surgery

The extended healing period required after lumbar spinal fusion surgery makes postoperative care especially important. While spinal fusion surgery has a high success rate for stabilizing 2 or more adjacent vertebrae and enabling a return to previous normal activity levels, the recovery time can vary based on many factors. These factors include the extent of the surgery, other medical conditions, and how closely the care instructions are followed.

Spinal Fusion Recovery Time

Most people are able to return home from the hospital about 2 to 4 days after lumbar spinal fusion surgery (if there are other people at home). Driving may be resumed a couple weeks after that if off opioid medications. It typically takes about 4 to 6 weeks to return to an office or sedentary job, but it can take 3 months or longer to return to activities that are more physical.

Despite the name of the surgery, the spine is not actually fused during a lumbar spinal fusion procedure. Instead, during the surgery a bone graft or substitute is placed in the spine that facilitates bone growth between the adjacent vertebrae to eventually form one bone, a process that usually takes about 3 to 6 months. The new bone will immobilize the spine at that segment. Screws, cages, plates, and rods may be implanted during surgery to stabilize the area while the bone heals and becomes solid. Some patients also wear a brace during recovery that limits motion.

The bone continues to mature and solidify over 12 to 18 months after the surgery. Many people with a single-level fusion are able to return to all activities even vigorous ones such as weightlifting or construction work—about 6 months after surgery.

Walking and Moving After Spinal Fusion Surgery

Keeping the spine aligned correctly is important after surgery in order to minimize its workload and reduce the risk of disrupting the healing process. Patients work with physical and occupational therapists each day to learn the safest ways to dress, sit, stand, walk, and take part in other activities without putting added stress on the back. Even getting out of bed requires a special technique—known as log-rolling—to avoid twisting the spine.

In some cases, the physical therapist may advise the patient to use a walker for stability. The occupational or physical therapist also helps arrange medical equipment for later use in the person’s home, if needed.

Many people find it helpful to bring sturdy slip-on shoes with them to the hospital, since surgeons and hospital staff encourage patients to get up and walk around as quickly as possible after the surgery.

 

From : spine-health.com

Please follow and like us:

What are the Most Common Types of Orthopedic Surgery?

An orthopedic surgery is any operation performed on the musculoskeletal system. This system is comprised of your bones, muscles, ligaments, joints and tendons. There are three different types of orthopedic surgery. Traditional procedures are now competing with minimally invasive arthroscopic surgeries that tout less pain and quicker recovery times.

Let’s take a look at the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures.

    • Joint Replacement Procedures. These procedures replace an injured joint with a prosthetic and are among the most common orthopedic operations. Common joint replacement surgeries include hip and knee replacement surgeries. It is important that patients are monitored for signs of complications after these procedures because the procedures carry a considerable amount of risk. Among these risks are the chances that the implant will fail or that the materials making up the implant will make their way into the blood, causing a toxic condition known as metalosis.
    • Revision Joint Surgery. If an existing implant has failed, it may be necessary to remove it and implant a new one. Revision surgeries are often required when the patient received a defective implant or an older implant has failed.
    • Debridement. Whenever tissue death has occurred and the affected tissue needs to be removed before healing can occur, a debridement procedure is how doctors will remove it. There are some cases where bone is also removed when necessary.
    • Spinal Fusion. Spinal fusions join the vertebrae together to provide more stability to the spine or to repair damage to the spine.
    • Bone Fusion. Like spinal fusions, bone fusions use grafting to fuse fractured bones together so that they can heal.
    • Soft tissue repair. These procedures focus on torn ligaments or tendons.
    • Internal Fixation of Bones. This type of surgery places fragments of bones together and keeps them in place using pins, screws or plates so that they can heal. In some cases, the devices will remain inside of the body.
    • Osteotomy. If a child has bone deformities, he or she will need this type of operation to help correct the deformity so that the bone grows properly.

From : www.rosenfeldinjurylawyers.com

Please follow and like us:

TIME TO SERIOUSLY CONSIDER FOCUSED MRIS FOR INJURED SPINES

Is it sufficient to only examine the injured part of the spine via focused magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) or will that lead to missed problems?

In patients who sustain blunt trauma, CT is the initial screening modality of choice in most emergency departments in the United States to look for injury to various parts of the body—including the spine. If a fracture is seen in the thoracic or lumbar spine on CT, sometimes an MRI of the injured segment of the spine is useful to provide additional information about the injury to help physicians decide on a treatment plan.”

“The problem is that MRI is a relatively expensive and time-consuming test compared to CT, so every time we were ordering MRIs of the entire spine in this scenario, it seemed somewhat excessive. Since we are mostly interested in looking at the part of the spine that we already know is injured (based on the CT), we asked ourselves if just imaging the injured portion of the spine by MRI (a focused MRI) would be adequate to provide the information we need to decide on a treatment plan. The concern with this approach is whether we would miss injuries by not looking at the entire spine by MRI.”

To answer the question, the investigators reviewed records for all adult trauma patients who presented to Mass General’s emergency department between 2008 and 2016 with one or more fractures of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine—as identified using computed tomography (CT) and who underwent MRI of the entire thoracic and lumbar spine within 10 days.

The most important result of the test, said Dr. Karim, was “that performing a focused MRI of only the injured portion of the spine would lead physicians to missing some sort of injury in another portion of the spine about 15% of the time, but none of these ‘missed injuries’ would lead to any change in treatment plan or patient care if they are known.”

“This is a very practical study from our perspective because it affects the day-to-day work of radiologists, emergency room physicians, and spine surgeons. If they see a fracture in the thoracic or lumbar spine on CT that they want to better characterize on MRI, they should be comfortable obtaining just a focused MRI of the injured portion of the spine—saving time, money, and patient discomfort.”

Reference From : https://ryortho.com

Please follow and like us:

    We offer a wide variety of safe and advanced Orthopedic Implants and fixators. At the helm of the company’s operations is Mr. Vinodbhai, the Director. His enterprising skills and experience in the industry continue to play a pivotal role in the company’s growth.We are based in Ahmedabad city West Part of India.

    ADDRESS

    Plot No.10, Phase-1, B|h. Prashant Eng., G.I.D.C.Vatva, Ahmedabad-382 445, Gujarat, (INDIA).

    PHONE

    +91 9375801932

    EMAIL

    info@smitmedimed.com

    Cart